Configuring PC Shares

From XBMC4Xbox
Jump to: navigation, search

One of the most convenient functions of XBMC is its ability to stream media from any networked PC (personal-computer). In this section, we look at some of the methods for configuring remote computers or storage devices to provide file access to XBMC. To learn how to access these remote shares in XBMC, please look at XBMC Media Sources.


Windows Sharing Alternatives

  • Windows File Sharing (SMB/SAMBA/CIFS) - This is the most capable XBMC method of sharing media. It is capable of streaming all types of media and gives the option of sharing individual folders or entire drives, (including CD/DVD-ROM drives). It also allows you to secure shares with passwords and restrict access to users or groups, which makes it ideal for use on a public network. Because it utilizes a service that is already packaged with Windows, it does not require you to install any additional software on your Windows PC.
  • UPnP Sharing - XBMC also supports UPnP shares (short for "Universal Plug and Play"). This is an extremely easy, user-friendly way to stream your media over your network. Like SMB/SAMBA/CIFS it is capable of streaming all types of media and gives the option of sharing individual folders or entire drives. Note that you must be using an XBMC build from 10th of July 2006 or newer in order to use this functionality.
  • The XBMS Protocol - XBMSP (XBox Media Stream Protocol) or XBMS for short, is very easy to use and set up, and is recommended for novices. It is capable of streaming all types of media and gives the option of sharing individual folders or entire drives. It can be configured through an easy-to-use GUI program installed on your PC. XBMS is very bandwidth efficient and it is a routable network-protocol which means that it is also ideal if you wish to stream over the internet, (just make sure you open the TCP/IP network-port 1400 in you firewalls on both the server-side and the client side)
  • iTunes (DAAP) - XBMC has the ability to stream audio files that you set up to share through iTunes. This method is extremely easy to set up and configure, although it is limited to audio files. It will not allow you to share videos, photos or other types of media. It also does not allow you to share entire folders or drives. iTunes version 7.0 has implemented changes to the DAAP protocol, namely the use of a new 'Client-DAAP-Validation' header hash when connecting to an iTunes 7.0 server. This does not affect 3rd party DAAP servers, however all current DAAP clients ( including official iTunes <=6.0 ) will fail to connect to an iTunes 7.0 server, receiving a '403 Forbidden' HTTP error.
  • Media Source FTP

Macintosh (Apple Mac OS X) Sharing Alternatives

  • Windows Sharing (SMB) on Mac OS X - This is incorporated in Mac OS X (OS 10.2 and later), and is probably the most flexible of all of the options for sharing media between your computer and XBMC. (Earlier versions of Mac OS can serve SMB using SAMBA). It is capable of streaming all types of media and gives the option of sharing individual folders (or entire drives - usually configured through the 3rd-party software SharePoints). It also allows for authentication by your Mac OS X username and password, making it good for use on public networks.
  • UPnP Sharing - XBMC also supports UPnP shares (short for "Universal Plug and Play"). This is an extremely easy, user-friendly way to stream your media over your network. Like SMB/SAMBA/CIFS it is capable of streaming all types of media and gives the option of sharing individual folders or entire drives. Note that you must be using an XBMC build from 10th of July 2006 or newer in order to use this functionality.
  • The XBMS Protocol - XBMSP (XBox Media Stream Protocol) or XBMS for short, is very easy to use and set up, and is recommended for novices. It is capable of streaming all types of media and gives the option of sharing individual folders or entire drives. It can be configured through an easy-to-use GUI program installed on your PC. XBMS is very bandwidth efficient and it is a routable network-protocol which means that it is also ideal if you which to stream over the internet, (just make sure you open the TCP/IP network-port 1400 in you firewalls on both the server-side and the client side).
  • iTunes (DAAP) - XBMC has the ability to stream audio files that you set up to share through Apple iTunes, and its database. This method is extremely easy to set up and configure, (although it is limited to audio files so it will not allow you to share videos, photos or other types of media, nor does not allow you to share entire folders or drives). Currently, XBMC is unable to browse libraries shared through iTunes 7.
  • Media Source FTP

Linux/UNIX/BSD/POSIX Sharing Alternatives

  • Linux File Sharing (using samba) - Also, see www.samba.org and read/follow the online-manual for your specific Linux-distribution.
  • UPnP Sharing - XBMC also supports UPnP shares (short for "Universal Plug and Play"). This is an extremely easy, user-friendly way to stream your media over your network. Like SMB/SAMBA/CIFS it is capable of streaming all types of media and gives the option of sharing individual folders or entire drives. Note that you must be using an XBMC build from 10th of July 2006 or newer in order to use this functionality.
  • The XBMS Protocol - XBMSP (XBox Media Stream Protocol) or XBMS for short, is very easy to use and set up, and is recommended for novices. It is capable of streaming all types of media and gives the option of sharing individual folders or entire drives. It can be configured through an easy-to-use GUI program installed on your PC. XBMS is very bandwidth efficient and it is a routable network-protocol which means that it is also ideal if you which to stream over the internet, (just make sure you open the TCP/IP network-port 1400 in you firewalls on both the server-side and the client side)
  • Media Source FTP

Advanced configuration of shares/sources (editing sources.xml)

For advanced configuration instructions about shares/bookmarks, (by editing sources.xml), see the Adding Media Sources and Types of Media Sources articles.